Sample Lesson 13: Adjusting to Change

The purpose of this lesson is to help students feel confident when facing change. They will work to develop attitudes and strategies that they can use when any kind of change occurs. Change can be difficult to deal with—especially unexpected or unwelcome change. Giving kids strategies and a mindset for dealing with change helps them to develop resilience and cognitive flexibility—both life skills that many workplaces are seeking.

When something unexpected or unwanted happens, it’s easy to get stuck feeling sad, angry, or out of control. In challenging situations, everyone has 2 fundamental options: to focus on what is outside of your control, which makes it seem like you are powerless to change the situation and leaves you feeling anxious and angry, or to focus on the aspects of the situation that are inside your control, and take ownership for doing what you can to improve either the situation itself or your response to it.

With any change, the key is confronting, owning, and controlling your thoughts. As you look at which things are within your control and which are not, you should consider how you feel when you focus on each of them. Focusing more on the things that are external (outside of your control) generally makes you feel more helpless and frustrated, whereas focusing more on what’s internal (inside your control) puts you back in the driver’s seat and gives you a greater chance of actually being able to reach your goals. Ultimately, shifting your focus from one circle to the other helps you start to develop more of an internal locus of control.

An internal locus of control is the belief that one’s life events and experiences (good and bad) are greatly influenced by personal factors such as one’s attitude, preparation, efforts, and actions. These are the people who believe that they make things happen and have the power to determine their future.

An external locus of control is the belief that one’s life events and experiences (good and bad) are mostly caused by forces outside of their control, such as the environment or other people. These are the people who believe that things in life happen to them, and feel like they do not have the power to change how the results turn out.

internal locus of control, external locus of control

Activity 1: (5 minutes) SIGNIFICANT CHANGES

“When you spend your emotional energy worrying about things you cannot change, you’re not allowing yourself to focus on what you can.” Ryan Holiday said it best: “There is no good or bad without us, there is only perception. There is the event itself, and the story we tell ourselves about what it means.”

Share the quote with students. In your writer’s notebook, briefly describe when you faced a significant change and how you reacted. Reflect carefully on your thoughts and refer back to the quotes above.

  • How much of your reaction was based on actual facts and how much was based on “the story”—the feelings from memories in your life or a future worry?
  • What is one strength of yours that would help you in this situation?

Share the quote with students. John Wooden (famous men’s basketball coach at UCLA) said, “Don’t let what you cannot do interfere with what you can.”

  • Looking back, has there been a time when you let your fears stop you from doing something?
  • What personal strength could you use, or what thought could you focus on that might change that?

Activity 2: (10 minutes) VENN DIAGRAM

When something unexpected or unwanted happens, it’s easy to get stuck feeling sad, angry, or out of control. In challenging situations, everyone has 2 fundamental options:

  1. To focus on what is outside of your control, which makes it seem like you are powerless to change the situation and leaves you feeling anxious, angry, or both;
    OR
  2. To focus on the aspects of the situation that are inside your control, and take ownership for doing what you can to improve either the situation itself or your response to it.

Look at these examples. Using your own Venn Diagram, list at least 5 specific, personal examples for each circle:

  • What are some things you can’t control? (e.g., losing a loved one, natural disasters, pandemics, how someone has treated you, having a bad day)
  • Identify the things that you can control. (e.g., how you treat other people, what activities you’ll do the next day, what goals you have, who you spend time with, how hard you try to do the best you can)
  • Write a short summary about your insights as you completed this template. What stood out to you? Which side was easiest to complete?

After completing this exercise, look back and recognize that for every situation in your life, there will always be some aspects of the situation you can’t control and others that you can. Being frustrated about things that are outside of your control will only take energy away.

Activity 3: (15 minutes) RANGE OF INTERNAL/EXTERNAL CONTROL

Share the following quote:

“The greatest weapon against stress is our ability to choose one thought over another.” (William Jones)

With any change, the key is confronting, owning, and controlling your thoughts. As you look at which things are within your control and which are not, you should consider how you feel when you focus on each of them. Focusing more on the things that are outside of your control generally makes you feel more helpless and frustrated, whereas focusing more on what’s inside your control puts you back in the driver’s seat and gives you a greater chance of actually being able to reach your goals. Ultimately, shifting your focus from one circle to the other helps you start to develop more of an internal locus of control.

An internal locus of control is the belief that one’s life events and experiences (good and bad) are greatly influenced by personal factors such as one’s attitude, preparation, efforts, and actions. These are the people who believe that they make things happen and have the power to determine their future.

An external locus of control is the belief that one’s life events and experiences (good and bad) are mostly caused by forces outside of their control, such as the environment or other people. These are the people who believe that things in life happen to them, and feel like they do not have the power to change how the results turn out.

Invite students to think about an important situation in their life right now: a key relationship, something with school, a family issue, a lack of confidence, etc. If you were to chart on a scale (from “out of my control” to “largely in my control”), where would you fall?

Create your own on your paper and mark where you see yourself in that situation. To what extent do you feel like your life is largely in your control versus out of your control? Do you usually feel like most things happen to you, or do you feel like you are the one making things happen?

Select one of the following resources and determine one strategy that can help you. Just acknowledging where you are on the scale is a great first step.

  • Choice Statements: Developing an Internal Locus of Control
    • Select 1 or 2 statements as your focus.
    • Using this focus, track your thinking for 7 days. What did you learn about yourself and your ability to deal with change?
  • Developing an Internal Locus of Control
    • Which of the 3 strategies will work best for you? Select one.
    • Using this strategy, track your thinking for 7 days. What did you learn about yourself and your ability to deal with change?

Activity 4: (15 minutes) VIDEO DISCUSSION

Invite students to watch the TED talk about adaptability and change.

  • How Adaptability Will Help You Deal with Change” TED talk (13:10, but start at 6:12). Have a class discussion.
  • What is the “adaptability equation” shown by people who adapt successfully to change?
  • Looking at the adaptability equation, which area do you need to focus on in order to adapt to change?
  • Using this focus, track your thinking for 7 days. What did you learn about yourself and your ability to deal with change?
  • What kind of person do you want to be in the face of change?

Activity 5: (ongoing) LOCUS OF CONTROL STRATEGIES

Read the article. Which of the 3 strategies will work best for you? Select one and write it down. Using this strategy, track your thinking for 7 days.

  • What did you learn about yourself and your ability to deal with change?

Activity 6: (15 minutes) CHANGING YOUR MINDSET VIDEO

Take notes as you watch the following TED talk. (Start at 9:46)
How Changing Your Mindset Can Help You Embrace Change

  • Think of a moment in your life that impacted or changed you.
  • What is the difference between planned change and unplanned change?
  • What does it mean to manage a new you?
  • When the speaker, Manu Shahi, says that “change is a very, very powerful coach,” how was that reflected in the key shift her daughter made?
  • From your notes, what is 1 piece of advice from this video that can help you embrace change? How could you apply that insight in your life?
  • How can embracing change help you?

Activity 7: (60 minutes) KINTSUGI

Invite students to learn more about “kintsugi” or the Japanese art of putting broken pottery pieces back together with gold—a metaphor for embracing your flaws and imperfections. Examine the images of kintsugi.

  • How do these images convey beauty and depth differently than if they were their original, non-cracked creations?
  • How is kintsugi a metaphor for change?

Share the quote by Bryant McGill:

“All beautiful things carry distinctions of imperfection. Your wounds and imperfections are your beauty. Like the broken pottery mended with gold, we are all kintsugi. Its philosophy and art state that breakage and mending are honest parts of a past, which should not be hidden. Your wounds and healing are a part of your history; a part of who you are. Every beautiful thing is damaged. You are that beauty; we all are.”

Invite students to write a poem, create a piece of art, or create a representation that depicts the spirit of kintsugi. Make sure students write an artist statement connected to their creative work that describes how change in their own life has made them a more beautiful creation.

Activity 8: (20 minutes) REFLECTION—GIVE ONE, GET ONE

Take 5 minutes to prepare your thoughts for the following prompts. Then do a Give One, Get One task where you gather ideas from others.

Give One, Get One is a discussion strategy where students actively and intentionally seek and share information with one another. Students first write down several ideas or important learnings in response to a prompt or questions provided by the teacher. Students circulate the classroom and, at the teacher’s prompting, pair up with a partner. Each partner “gives” or shares one of their ideas as the other partner “gets” or listens and writes it down. After a few minutes, the teacher signals for students to find new partners and repeat the process.

  • When looking at embracing change, which quote held the most meaning for you and why?
  • How can you see yourself applying this information—in school, at home, and with your friends?
  • Who is someone you know who has been an example of how to embrace change?
  • If you wanted to teach this info to a younger child, what key ideas would you tell them?
  • Focus on what you can control.
  • Reflect on your strengths.
  • Turn criticism into growth.
  • When something doesn’t go as you anticipated, practice self-compassion.
  • Focus on what you can learn, how you can evolve.
  • Celebrate how change has made you into something better.
  • Ask for help.
  • Create a lesson that you could teach to a younger classroom about adjusting to change.
  • Keep a 7-day reflection log: a daily accounting of how you have done in owning your thinking. How many days have you been successful in applying the choice statement you selected? At the end of the week, look back at your growth. What stands out to you? If you struggled, what distracted you from accepting the power of choosing? Once you feel confident with one statement, take a challenge and select another.
  • Using a tool like Adobe Spark, design an image that contains a favorite quote about the mindset needed to embrace change.

El propósito de esta lección es ayudar a los estudiantes a sentirse seguros al enfrentar el cambio. Trabajarán para desarrollar actitudes y estrategias que puedan usar cuando ocurra cualquier tipo de cambio. El cambio puede ser difícil de manejar, especialmente el cambio inesperado o no deseado. Darles a los niños estrategias y una mentalidad para lidiar con el cambio los ayuda a desarrollar resiliencia y flexibilidad cognitiva, ambas habilidades para la vida que muchos lugares de trabajo buscan.

Cuando sucede algo inesperado o no deseado, es fácil quedarse atascado sintiéndose triste, enojado o fuera de control. En situaciones desafiantes, todos tienen 2 opciones fundamentales: enfocarse en lo que está fuera de nuestro control, lo que hace que parezca que no podemos cambiar la situación y nos deja ansiosos y enojados, o enfocarnos en los aspectos de la situación que están bajo su control, y tome posesión por hacer lo que pueda para mejorar la situación en sí o su respuesta a ella.

Con cualquier cambio, la clave es confrontar, poseer y controlar tus pensamientos. A medida que observa qué cosas están bajo su control y cuáles no, debe considerar cómo se siente cuando se enfoca en cada una de ellas. Centrarse más en las cosas que son externas (fuera de su control) generalmente lo hace sentir más impotente y frustrado, mientras que centrarse más en lo que es interno (dentro de su control) lo pone vuelve al asiento del conductor y le brinda una mayor oportunidad de poder alcanzar sus objetivos. En última instancia, cambiar su enfoque de un círculo a otro lo ayuda a comenzar a desarrollar más un lugar de control interno.

Un locus de control interno es la creencia de que los eventos y experiencias de la vida de uno (buenos y malos) están muy influenciados por factores personales como la actitud, la preparación, los esfuerzos y las acciones de uno. Estas son las personas que creen que hacen que las cosas sucedan y tienen el poder de determinar su futuro.

Un lugar de control externo es la creencia de que los eventos y experiencias de la vida de uno (buenos y malos) son causados ​​principalmente por fuerzas fuera de su control, como el medio ambiente u otras personas. Estas son las personas que creen que les suceden cosas en la vida y sienten que no tienen el poder de cambiar la forma en que resultan los resultados.

locus de control interno, locus de control externo

Actividad 1: (5 minutos) CAMBIOS SIGNIFICATIVOS

“Cuando gastas tu energía emocional preocupándote por cosas que no puedes cambiar, no te estás permitiendo concentrarte en lo que sí puedes”. Ryan Holiday lo dijo mejor: “No hay nada bueno o malo sin nosotros, solo hay percepción. Está el evento en sí mismo y la historia que nos contamos sobre lo que significa”.

Comparta la cita con los estudiantes. En su cuaderno de escritor, describa brevemente cuándo enfrentó un cambio significativo y cómo reaccionó. Reflexione cuidadosamente sobre sus pensamientos y consulte las citas anteriores.

  • ¿Cuánto de su reacción se basó en hechos reales y cuánto se basó en “la historia”: los sentimientos de los recuerdos de su vida o una preocupación futura?
  • ¿Cuál es uno de tus puntos fuertes que te ayudaría en esta situación?

Comparta la cita con los estudiantes. John Wooden (famoso entrenador de baloncesto masculino en UCLA) dijo: “No dejes que lo que no puedes hacer interfiera con lo que puedes”.

  • Mirando hacia atrás, ¿ha habido algún momento en que permitiste que tus miedos te impidieran hacer algo?
  • ¿Qué fuerza personal podrías usar o en qué pensamiento podrías concentrarte para cambiar eso?

Actividad 2: (10 minutos) DIAGRAMA DE VENN

Cuando sucede algo inesperado o no deseado, es fácil quedarse atascado sintiéndose triste, enojado o fuera de control. En situaciones desafiantes, todos tienen 2 opciones fundamentales:

  1. Enfocarse en lo que está fuera de su control, lo que hace que parezca que no tiene poder para cambiar la situación y lo deja ansioso, enojado o ambos;
    O
  2. Enfocarse en los aspectos de la situación que están bajo su control y asumir la responsabilidad de hacer lo que pueda para mejorar la situación en sí o su respuesta a ella.

Mira estos ejemplos. Usando su propio Diagrama de Venn, enumere al menos 5 ejemplos personales específicos para cada círculo:

  • ¿Cuáles son algunas cosas que no puedes controlar? (p. ej., perder a un ser querido, desastres naturales, pandemias, cómo alguien lo ha tratado, tener un mal día)
  • Identifique las cosas que puede controlar. (p. ej., cómo trata a otras personas, qué actividades hará al día siguiente, qué metas tiene, con quién pasa el tiempo, cuánto se esfuerza por hacer lo mejor que puede)
  • Escriba un breve resumen sobre sus conocimientos mientras completaba esta plantilla. ¿Qué te llamó la atención? ¿Qué lado fue más fácil de completar?

Después de completar este ejercicio, mire hacia atrás y reconozca que para cada situación en su vida, siempre habrá algunos aspectos de la situación que no puede controlar y otros que sí. Estar frustrado por cosas que están fuera de tu control solo te quitará energía.

Actividad 3: (15 minutos) RANGO DE CONTROL INTERNO/EXTERNO

Comparte la siguiente cita:

“La mejor arma contra el estrés es nuestra capacidad de elegir un pensamiento sobre otro”. (Guillermo Jones)

Con cualquier cambio, la clave es confrontar, poseer y controlar tus pensamientos. A medida que observa qué cosas están bajo su control y cuáles no, debe considerar cómo se siente cuando se enfoca en cada una de ellas. Centrarse más en las cosas que están fuera de su control generalmente lo hace sentir más impotente y frustrado, mientras que concentrarse más en lo que está dentro de su control lo coloca nuevamente en el asiento del conductor y le da una mayor oportunidad de ser capaz de alcanzar sus metas. En última instancia, cambiar su enfoque de un círculo a otro lo ayuda a comenzar a desarrollar más un lugar de control interno.

Un locus de control interno es la creencia de que los eventos y experiencias de la vida de uno (buenos y malos) están muy influenciados por factores personales como la actitud, la preparación, los esfuerzos y las acciones de uno. Estas son las personas que creen que hacen que las cosas sucedan y tienen el poder de determinar su futuro.

Un lugar de control externo es la creencia de que los eventos y experiencias de la vida de uno (buenos y malos) son causados ​​principalmente por fuerzas fuera de su control, como el medio ambiente u otras personas. Estas son las personas que creen que les suceden cosas en la vida y sienten que no tienen el poder de cambiar la forma en que resultan los resultados.

Invite a los estudiantes a pensar en una situación importante en su vida en este momento: una relación clave, algo con la escuela, un problema familiar, falta de confianza, etc. “en gran parte bajo mi control”), ¿dónde caerías?

Crea el tuyo propio en tu papel y marca donde te ves en esa situación. ¿Hasta qué punto siente que su vida está en gran medida bajo su control o fuera de su control? ¿Sueles sentir que la mayoría de las cosas te suceden o sientes que eres tú quien hace que las cosas sucedan?

Seleccione uno de los siguientes recursos y determine una estrategia que pueda ayudarlo. El simple hecho de reconocer dónde se encuentra en la escala es un gran primer paso.

  • Declaraciones de elección: desarrollo de un locus de control interno
    • Seleccione 1 o 2 declaraciones como su enfoque.
    • Usando este enfoque, haga un seguimiento de su pensamiento durante 7 días. ¿Qué aprendiste sobre ti mismo y tu capacidad para lidiar con el cambio?
  • Desarrollo de un lugar de control interno
    • ¿Cuál de las 3 estrategias funcionará mejor para usted? Seleccione uno.
    • Usando esta estrategia, haz un seguimiento de tus pensamientos durante 7 días. ¿Qué aprendiste sobre ti mismo y tu capacidad para lidiar con el cambio?

Actividad 4: (15 minutos) VIDEO DEBATE

Invite a los estudiantes a ver la charla TED sobre adaptabilidad y cambio.

  • Cómo afectará la adaptabilidad Ayudarle a lidiar con el cambio” Charla TED (13:10, pero comienza a las 6:12). Tenga una discusión en clase.
  • ¿Cuál es la “ecuación de adaptabilidad” que muestran las personas que se adaptan con éxito al cambio?
  • En cuanto a la ecuación de adaptabilidad, ¿en qué área necesita concentrarse para adaptarse al cambio?
  • Usando este enfoque, haga un seguimiento de su pensamiento durante 7 días. ¿Qué aprendiste sobre ti mismo y tu capacidad para lidiar con el cambio?
  • ¿Qué tipo de persona quieres ser frente al cambio?

Actividad 5: (continua) ESTRATEGIAS DE LUGAR DE CONTROL

Leer el artículo. ¿Cuál de las 3 estrategias funcionará mejor para usted? Seleccione uno y escríbalo. Usando esta estrategia, haga un seguimiento de su pensamiento durante 7 días.

  • ¿Qué aprendiste sobre ti mismo y tu capacidad para lidiar con el cambio?

Actividad 6: (15 minutos) VIDEO CAMBIANDO TU MENTALIDAD

Toma notas mientras miras la siguiente charla TED. (Comienza a las 9:46)
Cómo puede ayudar el cambio de mentalidad aceptas el cambio

  • Piense en un momento de su vida que lo haya impactado o cambiado.
  • ¿Cuál es la diferencia entre el cambio planificado y el cambio no planificado?
  • ¿Qué significa gestionar un nuevo yo?
  • Cuando el orador, Manu Shahi, dice que “el cambio es un entrenador muy, muy poderoso”, ¿cómo se reflejó eso en el cambio clave que hizo su hija?
  • De tus notas, ¿cuál es el consejo de este video que puede ayudarte a aceptar el cambio? ¿Cómo podrías aplicar esa idea en tu vida?
  • ¿Cómo puede ayudarte aceptar el cambio?

Actividad 7: (60 minutos) KINTSUGI

Invite a los alumnos a aprender más sobre “kintsugi” o el arte japonés de volver a unir piezas de cerámica rotas con oro, una metáfora para aceptar sus defectos e imperfecciones. Examine las imágenes de kintsugi.

  • ¿En qué forma estas imágenes transmiten belleza y profundidad de manera diferente a si fueran sus creaciones originales sin grietas?
  • ¿Cómo es kintsugi una metáfora del cambio?

Comparta la cita de Bryant McGill:

“Todas las cosas bellas llevan distinciones de imperfección. Tus heridas e imperfecciones son tu belleza. Como la cerámica rota remendada con oro, todos somos kintsugi. Su filosofía y arte afirman que la rotura y el remiendo son partes honestas de un pasado, que no se debe ocultar. Tus heridas y sanidades son parte de tu historia; una parte de lo que eres. Todo lo bello está dañado. Tú eres esa belleza; todos lo somos.”

Invite a los estudiantes a escribir un poema, crear una obra de arte o crear una representación que represente el espíritu del kintsugi. Asegúrese de que los estudiantes escriban una declaración del artista relacionada con su trabajo creativo que describa cómo el cambio en su propia vida los ha convertido en una creación más hermosa.

Actividad 8: (20 minutos) REFLEXIÓN: DAR UNO, OBTENER UNO

Tómese 5 minutos para preparar sus pensamientos para las siguientes indicaciones. Luego haga una tarea de Dar uno, obtener uno en la que recopile ideas de otros.

Give One, Get One es una estrategia de discusión en la que los estudiantes buscan y comparten información entre sí de manera activa e intencional. Los estudiantes primero escriben varias ideas o aprendizajes importantes en respuesta a un mensaje o preguntas proporcionadas por el maestro. Los estudiantes circulan por el salón de clases y, a instancias del maestro, forman parejas con un compañero. Cada socio “da” o comparte una de sus ideas mientras el otro socio “obtiene” o escucha y la escribe. Después de unos minutos, el maestro indica a los estudiantes que busquen nuevos compañeros y repitan el proceso.

  • Al analizar aceptar el cambio, ¿qué cita tuvo más significado para usted y por qué?
  • ¿Cómo te ves aplicando esta información: en la escuela, en casa y con tus amigos?
  • ¿Quién es alguien que conozcas que haya sido un ejemplo de cómo aceptar el cambio?
  • Si quisiera enseñar esta información a un niño más pequeño, ¿qué ideas clave le diría?
  • Concéntrese en lo que puede controlar.
  • Reflexiona sobre tus puntos fuertes.
  • Convierta la crítica en crecimiento.
  • Cuando algo no sale como esperabas, practica la autocompasión.
  • Concéntrate en lo que puedes aprender, cómo puedes evolucionar.
  • Celebra cómo el cambio te ha convertido en algo mejor.
  • Pide ayuda.
  • Cree una lección que podría enseñar a una clase más joven sobre cómo adaptarse al cambio.
  • Lleve un registro de reflexión de 7 días: un registro diario de cómo lo ha hecho en la apropiación de su pensamiento. ¿Cuántos días ha tenido éxito en la aplicación de la declaración de elección que seleccionó? Al final de la semana, mire hacia atrás en su crecimiento. ¿Qué es lo que te destaca? Si luchaste, ¿qué te distrajo de aceptar el poder de elegir? Una vez que se sienta seguro con una afirmación, acepte un desafío y seleccione otra.
  • Usando una herramienta como Adobe Spark, diseñe una imagen que contenga una cita favorita sobre la mentalidad necesaria para adoptar el cambio.