Lesson 23: Choices & Consequences

The purpose of this lesson is to help students recognize that they have many choices that impact both their current and future life—specifically, the choices they make at school and in their relationships with others.

Agency describes our capacity to act in an empowered and autonomous way. Beliefs about our agency influence confidence and contribute to our resiliency. We can empower students to exercise their agency by engaging them in decision-making and giving them choices that allow them to direct their own learning. Student-directed learning is also known as active learning. The Future of Jobs Report, from the World Economic Forum, predicts the top 10 skills needed for jobs in 2025 will include analytical thinking and active learning. These 2 skills have not previously made the list. While critical thinking and problem solving used to lead the pack, active learning is now more important than either.

choice, consequence, agency, rules

Activity 1: (30 minutes) AGENCY VS RULES

Invite students to think about the rules they are asked to keep at home and at school. Have a discussion. Make a list on the board. Divide the class into groups of 3–4 students and divide out the rules among the groups. Invite each group to do the following:

  • Describe the rule.
  • Describe the short-term consequences of not keeping the rules.
  • Describe the long-term consequences of not keeping the rules.
  • Analyze the outcomes between safe and responsible behavior versus risky and harmful behavior on their health and well-being.
  • What are the barriers to keeping the rule?
  • What strategy or plan could you put in place to help you establish and adhere to your personal boundaries and rules?
  • Describe the relationship between societal rules and agency, choice, and voice.

Have each group share at least one rule they discussed with the class.

Activity 2: (30 minutes) CHOICES AND CONSEQUENCES

Divide the class into groups of 3 or 4. Remind students that consequences come as a result of choices. If we think about the consequences (both good and bad), it can help us make better choices. Thinking about short-term and long-term consequences can also help us make better choices. As a group, discuss the following choices addressing the questions asked.

“Should I attend college?”

  • What are the natural consequences (good and bad) of this choice?
  • What are the short-term and long-term consequences of this choice?
  • What other options do I have?

“Should I take the harder class or the easy A?”

  • What are the natural consequences (good and bad) of this choice?
  • What are the short-term and long-term consequences of this choice?
  • What other options do I have?

“Should I get a job or focus on school?”

  • What are the natural consequences (good and bad) of this choice?
  • What are the short-term and long-term consequences of this choice?
  • What other options do I have?

Once groups have discussed all 3 questions, have each group share their ideas with the class.

Finally, invite students to write their own “report card” in which they grade themselves on how well they are following through on their responsibilities and the choices they are making. Have students add comments that defend the grade.

Activity 3: (30 minutes) SKILLS FOR MY IDEAL JOB

Have students research career and college interests and learn about specific job responsibilities. Invite students to think about their current classes and what skills they are learning to prepare them for their “ideal” job.

  • What skills do I already have for my ideal job?
  • What skills am I learning that are preparing me for my ideal job?
  • What skills do I need to gain for my ideal job?
  • How do my choices today impact my ability to have the ideal job later?

Activity 4: (30 minutes) SKILLS FOR SUCCESS 2025

Share this image about the top 10 skills from the Future of Jobs Report, World Economic Forum. The image shows the top 10 skills workers were predicted to need in the past (2015 and 2020). Ask students what top 10 skills will be important for jobs created in the year 2025? Have students work with a partner to make an ordered list. Have a class discussion:

  • How has the list changed between 2020 and 2025? Note the biggest change is the addition of the first 2 items: analytical thinking and active learning.
  • What does this mean?
  • What classes are you currently taking, or do you plan to take, that will help you develop the skills listed in the World Economic Forum?
  • Thinking about your career path, which of these skills do you think will be most important for your future? Why?
  • How does this relate to agency, voice and choice?

Activity 5: (30 minutes) CHOICES AND CONSEQUENCES

As the teacher, choose several of the students’ choices that are appropriate for the class and engage in an “option” brainstorming session as a class. For example: I have to decide if I am going to stay home and get caught up on my homework or go out to a party that I have been waiting to be invited to.

Model for the students how they can brainstorm different options to the decision and, as a class, come up with some additional ideas and choices.

Remind students that consequences come as a result of choices. If we think about the consequences (both good and bad), it can help us make better choices. Thinking about short-term and long-term consequences also helps us make better choices.

Share the choice “After graduation, should I take a year off or continue my education?” with students.

  • What are the natural consequences (good and bad) of this choice?
  • What are the short-term and long-term consequences of this choice?
  • What other options do I have?

Divide the class up into groups of 3–4. Give each group 3 or 4 decision-making scenarios (sticky note choices provided by the students at the beginning of this activity). Ask the groups to discuss the scenarios using the following questions:

  • What are the natural consequences (good and bad) of this choice?
  • What are the short-term and long-term consequences of this choice?
  • What other options do I have?

If time permits, groups can share their discussions with the class.

Activity 6: (30 minutes) WHO IS IN CHARGE OF YOU?

Invite students to choose 1 of the following quotes and write a response to it:

  • “The best day of your life is the one on which you decide your life is your own. No apologies or excuses. No one to lean on, rely on, or blame. The gift is yours. It is an amazing journey and you alone are responsible for the quality of it. This is the day your life really begins.” –Bob Moawad
  • “You must take personal responsibility. You cannot change the circumstances, the seasons, or the wind. But you can change yourself. That is something you have charge of.” –Jim Rohn
  • “The moment you accept responsibility for everything in your life is the moment you gain the power to change anything in your life.” –Hal Elrod
  • “The final forming of a person’s character lies in their own hands.” –Anne Frank

Invite students to address the following questions:

  • Highlight the parts of the quote that resonate with you.
  • Write down questions that come to mind as you read the quote.
  • What do you disagree with? Why?
  • Rewrite the quote so that it rings true to you and your life experience.

Invite students to design their newly written quote. Put the quotes up around the classroom and hallways.

  • Where can you increase agency and choice in your daily life?
  • How does agency lead to empowerment?
  • What choices can you make that will improve your well-being?
  • How can you make choices that align with your own personal values and boundaries?
  • How can you support others in making healthy choices?
  • How do your choices impact your school success and relationships?
  • How do your choices impact your happiness?
  • Identify areas of life that are within your control.
  • Brainstorm different options to the choices.
  • Review the pros and cons of various options.
  • Create an action plan to move forward.
  • Discuss opportunities to make more decisions with adults at home and at school.
  • Reflect on the short-term and long-term outcomes of your choices.
  • Make choices that align with your personal values and long-term goals.
  • Often, our choices have both short-term and long-term consequences. Think about the rules that you are asked to keep at home and at school. What do you wish you would have known about these rules during middle school? Write a letter to your 12–15-year-old self describing the rule, possible scenarios, and what you wish you would have known.
  • As a class project, have students design a brochure detailing safety issues and procedures regarding common scenarios and behaviors. Share the brochures with the middle or junior high school students in your area. Set up a time to go and visit with select classes at the junior high or middle school and invite high school students to share what they have learned and what they wish they would have known.

El propósito de esta lección es ayudar a los estudiantes a reconocer que tienen muchas opciones que impactan su vida actual y futura, específicamente, las elecciones que hacen en la escuela y en sus relaciones con los demás.

La agencia describe nuestra capacidad para actuar de manera empoderada y autónoma. Las creencias sobre nuestra agencia influyen en la confianza y contribuyen a nuestra resiliencia. Podemos capacitar a los estudiantes para que ejerzan su agencia al involucrarlos en la toma de decisiones y darles opciones que les permitan dirigir su propio aprendizaje. El aprendizaje dirigido por el estudiante también se conoce como aprendizaje activo. El informe Future of Jobs, del Foro Económico Mundial, predice que las 10 habilidades principales necesarias para los trabajos en 2025 incluirán el pensamiento analítico y el aprendizaje activo. Estas 2 habilidades no han hecho previamente la lista. Si bien el pensamiento crítico y la resolución de problemas solían liderar el grupo, el aprendizaje activo ahora es más importante que cualquiera de los dos.

elección, consecuencia, agencia, reglas

Actividad 1: (30 minutos) AGENCIA VS REGLAS

Invite a los alumnos a pensar en las reglas que se les pide que mantengan en casa y en la escuela. Tener una discucion. Haga una lista en la pizarra. Divida la clase en grupos de 3 o 4 estudiantes y reparta las reglas entre los grupos. Invite a cada grupo a hacer lo siguiente:

  • Describa la regla.
  • Describa las consecuencias a corto plazo de no cumplir las reglas.
  • Describa las consecuencias a largo plazo de no cumplir las reglas.
  • Analizar los resultados entre el comportamiento seguro y responsable frente al comportamiento arriesgado y dañino en su salud y bienestar.
  • ¿Cuáles son las barreras para mantener la regla?
  • ¿Qué estrategia o plan podría implementar para ayudarlo a establecer y adherirse a sus límites y reglas personales?
  • Describa la relación entre las reglas sociales y la agencia, la elección y la voz.

Pida a cada grupo que comparta al menos una regla que discutieron con la clase.

Actividad 2: (30 minutos) OPCIONES Y CONSECUENCIAS

Divida la clase en grupos de 3 o 4. Recuerde a los estudiantes que las consecuencias vienen como resultado de las elecciones. Si pensamos en las consecuencias (tanto buenas como malas), puede ayudarnos a tomar mejores decisiones. Pensar en las consecuencias a corto y largo plazo también puede ayudarnos a tomar mejores decisiones. Como grupo, discuta las siguientes opciones para abordar las preguntas formuladas.

“¿Debería asistir a la universidad?”

  • ¿Cuáles son las consecuencias naturales (buenas y malas) de esta elección?
  • ¿Cuáles son las consecuencias a corto y largo plazo de esta elección?
  • ¿Qué otras opciones tengo?

“¿Debería tomar la clase más difícil o la fácil A?”

  • ¿Cuáles son las consecuencias naturales (buenas y malas) de esta elección?
  • ¿Cuáles son las consecuencias a corto y largo plazo de esta elección?
  • ¿Qué otras opciones tengo?

“¿Debería conseguir un trabajo o concentrarme en la escuela?”

  • ¿Cuáles son las consecuencias naturales (buenas y malas) de esta elección?
  • ¿Cuáles son las consecuencias a corto y largo plazo de esta elección?
  • ¿Qué otras opciones tengo?

Una vez que los grupos hayan discutido las 3 preguntas, haga que cada grupo comparta sus ideas con la clase.

Finalmente, invite a los estudiantes a escribir su propia “boleta de calificaciones” en la que se califican a sí mismos sobre qué tan bien están cumpliendo con sus responsabilidades y las decisiones que están tomando. Pida a los estudiantes que agreguen comentarios que defiendan la calificación.

Actividad 3: (30 minutos) HABILIDADES PARA MI TRABAJO IDEAL

Haga que los estudiantes investiguen sus intereses universitarios y profesionales y aprendan sobre las responsabilidades laborales específicas. Invite a los estudiantes a pensar en sus clases actuales y qué habilidades están aprendiendo para prepararlos para su trabajo “ideal”.

  • ¿Qué habilidades tengo ya para mi trabajo ideal?
  • ¿Qué habilidades estoy aprendiendo que me están preparando para mi trabajo ideal?
  • ¿Qué habilidades necesito adquirir para mi trabajo ideal?
  • ¿Cómo afectan mis elecciones de hoy mi capacidad para tener el trabajo ideal más adelante?

Actividad 4: (30 minutos) HABILIDADES PARA EL ÉXITO 2025

Comparta esta imagen sobre las 10 habilidades principales del Informe sobre el futuro de los trabajos, Foro Económico Mundial. La imagen muestra las 10 habilidades principales que se predijo que necesitarían los trabajadores en el pasado (2015 y 2020). Pregunte a los estudiantes qué 10 habilidades principales serán importantes para los trabajos creados en el año 2025. Pida a los estudiantes que trabajen con un compañero para hacer una lista ordenada. Tener una discusión en clase:

  • ¿Cómo ha cambiado la lista entre 2020 y 2025? Tenga en cuenta que el mayor cambio es la adición de los primeros 2 elementos: pensamiento analítico y aprendizaje activo.
  • ¿Qué significa esto?
  • ¿Qué clases estás tomando actualmente, o planeas tomar, que te ayudarán a desarrollar las habilidades enumeradas en el Foro Económico Mundial?
  • Pensando en tu trayectoria profesional, ¿cuál de estas habilidades crees que será más importante para tu futuro? ¿Por qué?
  • ¿Cómo se relaciona esto con la agencia, la voz y la elección?

Actividad 5: (30 minutos) OPCIONES Y CONSECUENCIAS

Como maestro, elija varias de las opciones de los estudiantes que sean apropiadas para la clase y participe en una sesión de lluvia de ideas sobre “opciones” como clase. Por ejemplo: tengo que decidir si me quedaré en casa y me pondré al día con mi tarea o saldré a una fiesta a la que he estado esperando que me inviten.

Modele para los estudiantes cómo pueden hacer una lluvia de ideas sobre diferentes opciones para la decisión y, como clase, proponer algunas ideas y opciones adicionales.

Recuerde a los estudiantes que las consecuencias vienen como resultado de las elecciones. Si pensamos en las consecuencias (tanto buenas como malas), puede ayudarnos a tomar mejores decisiones. Pensar en las consecuencias a corto y largo plazo también nos ayuda a tomar mejores decisiones.

Comparta la opción “Después de la graduación, ¿debería tomarme un año sabático o continuar mi educación?” con estudiantes

  • ¿Cuáles son las consecuencias naturales (buenas y malas) de esta elección?
  • ¿Cuáles son las consecuencias a corto y largo plazo de esta elección?
  • ¿Qué otras opciones tengo?

Divida la clase en grupos de 3 o 4. Dé a cada grupo 3 o 4 escenarios de toma de decisiones (opciones de notas adhesivas proporcionadas por los estudiantes al comienzo de esta actividad). Pida a los grupos que discutan los escenarios usando las siguientes preguntas:

  • ¿Cuáles son las consecuencias naturales (buenas y malas) de esta elección?
  • ¿Cuáles son las consecuencias a corto y largo plazo de esta elección?
  • ¿Qué otras opciones tengo?

Si el tiempo lo permite, los grupos pueden compartir sus discusiones con la clase.

Actividad 6: (30 minutos) ¿QUIÉN ESTÁ A CARGO DE TI?

Invite a los alumnos a elegir 1 de las siguientes citas y escribir una respuesta:

  • “El mejor día de tu vida es aquel en el que decides que tu vida es tuya. Sin disculpas ni excusas. Nadie en quien apoyarse, confiar o culpar. El regalo es tuyo. Es un viaje asombroso y solo usted es responsable de la calidad del mismo. Este es el día en que tu vida realmente comienza”. –Bob Moawad
  • “Debes asumir la responsabilidad personal. No puedes cambiar las circunstancias, las estaciones o el viento. Pero puedes cambiarte a ti mismo. Eso es algo de lo que tú estás a cargo. –Jim Rohn
  • “El momento en que aceptas la responsabilidad de todo en tu vida es el momento en que obtienes el poder de cambiar cualquier cosa en tu vida”. –Hal Elrod
  • “La formación final del carácter de una persona está en sus propias manos”. –Ana Frank

Invite a los alumnos a responder las siguientes preguntas:

  • Resalte las partes de la cita que resuenen con usted.
  • Escriba las preguntas que le vengan a la mente mientras lee la cita.
  • ¿Con qué no estás de acuerdo? ¿Por qué?
  • Vuelva a escribir la cita para que suene fiel a usted y a su experiencia de vida.

Invite a los estudiantes a diseñar su cita recién escrita. Coloque las citas alrededor del salón de clases y los pasillos.

  • ¿Dónde puede aumentar el albedrío y las opciones en su vida diaria?
  • ¿Cómo conduce la agencia al empoderamiento?
  • ¿Qué decisiones puede tomar para mejorar su bienestar?
  • ¿Cómo puedes tomar decisiones que se alineen con tus propios valores y límites personales?
  • ¿Cómo puede ayudar a otros a tomar decisiones saludables?
  • ¿Cómo afectan tus elecciones a tu éxito escolar y a tus relaciones?
  • ¿Cómo afectan tus elecciones a tu felicidad?
  • Identifique las áreas de la vida que están bajo su control.
  • Lluvia de ideas sobre diferentes opciones a las opciones.
  • Revise los pros y los contras de varias opciones.
  • Cree un plan de acción para avanzar.
  • Discuta las oportunidades para tomar más decisiones con los adultos en el hogar y en la escuela.
  • Reflexione sobre los resultados a corto y largo plazo de sus elecciones.
  • Tome decisiones que se alineen con sus valores personales y objetivos a largo plazo.
  • A menudo, nuestras elecciones tienen consecuencias tanto a corto como a largo plazo. Piensa en las reglas que te piden que cumplas en casa y en la escuela. ¿Qué te hubiera gustado saber sobre estas reglas durante la escuela intermedia? Escríbale una carta a su yo de 12 a 15 años describiendo la regla, los posibles escenarios y lo que desearía haber sabido.
  • Como proyecto de clase, pida a los alumnos que diseñen un folleto que detalle los problemas y procedimientos de seguridad en relación con escenarios y comportamientos comunes. Comparta los folletos con los estudiantes de secundaria o preparatoria de su área. Fije un tiempo para ir y visitar clases seleccionadas en la escuela secundaria o intermedia e invite a los estudiantes de secundaria a compartir lo que han aprendido y lo que desearían haber sabido.